6 Critical Elements of your Business Fan Page

I’m going to start at the top and work my way down but that doesn’t mean that any of them are more important or less important.

At the top of the fan page, you have your cover image. This is where you do your branding. This is when somebody comes to your page, the first thing they see is your cover image and your profile image.

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I have seen a lot of people create cover images that look very spammy or they do their own designs. Spend a little bit of money to get a professional to design your cover image. It will make a world of difference.

It would cost you 5,000 KES maybe  even 10,000 KES to have a professional design your cover image for you and what you want to have on your cover image is you want to have your logo usually at the top left just like in a website.

You want to have some imagery that your market would easily understand. So for my market, they understand mind maps and especially if I talk about a mind map related to traffic.

They understand that. Whatever it is that your market is going to understand, you should have that in your cover image.

Then you should also have what is the unique benefit of your fan page. For mine, I ran on there “Website traffic will never be your problem again.” So they know that if they subscribe to this fan page, if they click the Like button, then they’re going to get information related to website traffic and eventually website traffic will never be their problem again.

So you want your logo on there. You want imagery that’s going to tell your audience exactly what it is that you’re talking about and then you want your slogan or your USP, your hook, whatever it is that separates you from every other fan page. You want to have that stuff on your cover image.

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The next thing, is your profile image. I see a lot of Kenyan businesses(me too) put their logo as the profile image or their product as the profile image. When you’re talking with other people on your fan page, it looks weird when they’re talking to a logo.

Put your own face there. It helps when you’re talking with people so that they feel like they’re having a conversation with an actual person and not with a logo and not with a product shot.

Make sure that your profile image shows you in a light that would be what the people would think you should be.

Now I’m not saying that you need to act differently or be anything that you’re not. But you want to really emphasize what it is that you are.

So in your profile image for me, people like to see a life of freedom, business.

So I usually either have a picture of me where I’m dressed up in business attire or I have a picture of me where I’m out on a beach somewhere or travelling, having some fun.

Those are the two things my audience wants to see in somebody that they’re going to subscribe to, that they are a businessman who has a lot of fun in his life. So I try to portray that.

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Next thing is your “about” section. I see so many times people don’t put their link to their website in the “about” section.

You can have a clickable link right there on your fan page, right below your profile image.

So many businesses don’t utilise this area. This area is where you want to have basically your headline or whatever your strong call to action is, whatever is your unique selling point.

You want to use this space. You don’t have a whole lot of room. You have room for maybe one long sentence or two short sentences and then your link.

In mine and in my clients’ fan pages, we do one paragraph sometimes more and then we put the link to their website right there.

That way it’s right there on the front page and we get a lot of clicks from this.

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The next really important part of a fan page is the insights. So you won’t see this on your fan page.

You normally got to go in to edit your fan page settings and this is where you’re going to be able to see how viral was the last post that you had compared to the others.

Are the amounts of likes you’re getting trending up? Is your weekly reach trending up or trending down?

This is basically your analytics that shows you how well you’re doing or how poorly you’re doing on your fan page.

It’s really important to pay attention to that. You have your tabs.

Your fan page tabs are the pieces of your website or your fan page that allow you to pull in pages of your website, so that you can build your email list, get people to join your webinar, so that you can get people to watch your sales video or read your sales page.

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Whatever it is that you want them to do, the fan page tabs give you this big blank canvass to do whatever you want to do on there.

Show a video, opt-in form and then obviously you have your actual timeline and your timeline doesn’t matter so much after somebody subscribes to your page.

Once somebody comes to your page and clicks Like, most of the time they’re never coming back.

What they’re doing is they’re subscribing to your page and then they’re going to see your updates in their news feed.

So when they click the Home button in that middle portion of Facebook, that’s where they’re going to see your posts.

Very rarely are they going to actually come to your website or your fan page. So it’s important that when somebody does come to your fan page and they look at all the different posts that you’ve been posting lately, that they see things that they would want to subscribe to.

So, if they look at your timeline and it’s all promotional stuff, they will be like, “I don’t want to subscribe to this. I’m basically subscribing to nothing but commercials,” and we all know how much people are watching commercials these days, right?

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So you want to have content on your timeline that is the type of content your target fans would want to subscribe to and those are the six different critical elements you have – your cover image, your profile image, your “about” section, your timeline, the tabs and your insights.

 

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